lifeunderthewaves:

Giant Manta (Manta birostris) filter feeding. Raja Ampat, Indonesia. by ArturodeFrias Giant Manta Ray
(Manta birostris)
Frontal portrait of Giant Manta Ray filter feeding. These huge animals (with a wingspan of up to 7 meters) staged an incredible ballet around us, slowly flapping their wings with amazing majestuosity.
Waigeo, Raja Ampat, West Papua, Indonesia.

lifeunderthewaves:

Giant Manta (Manta birostris) filter feeding. Raja Ampat, Indonesia. by ArturodeFrias Giant Manta Ray
(Manta birostris)
Frontal portrait of Giant Manta Ray filter feeding. These huge animals (with a wingspan of up to 7 meters) staged an incredible ballet around us, slowly flapping their wings with amazing majestuosity.
Waigeo, Raja Ampat, West Papua, Indonesia.

ichthyologist:

Manta Rays at Cleaning Station
Due to their large size, manta rays are easy hosts for parasites. The rays have been observed to visit cleaning stations in coral reefs. These open areas are inhabited by a number of smaller fish species which pick parasites off of the ray’s body and gill slits. This relationship is an example of mutualistic symbiosis as the cleaners get an easy meal while the mantas get their parasites removed.
Boris Bialek on Flickr

ichthyologist:

Manta Rays at Cleaning Station

Due to their large size, manta rays are easy hosts for parasites. The rays have been observed to visit cleaning stations in coral reefs. These open areas are inhabited by a number of smaller fish species which pick parasites off of the ray’s body and gill slits. This relationship is an example of mutualistic symbiosis as the cleaners get an easy meal while the mantas get their parasites removed.

Boris Bialek on Flickr

(via p4cifc)

sansaspark:

During the scene when Mulan decides to go to war instead of her father, she decides to do it while sitting on the foot of the Great Stone Dragon. The image of the dragon looking over Mulan is repeated several times throughout the sequence, and the bolts of lightning strike at significant times whenever the dragon is in sight. When Mulan takes her father’s scroll and when she is praying to her ancestors, the Great Stone Dragon can be seen. It is also engraved on the sword Mulan uses to cut her hair and the handles of the wardrobe containing the armor are in the shape of the dragon’s head. The dragon’s eyes glowing in the temple symbolizes Mulan’s role as protector of her family awakening, instead of the actual dragon.

The reason Mushu couldn’t wake the dragon is because the dragon was no longer there. Mulan is implied to be the Great Dragon that protects her family.

(via makenoteofit)

we-are-star-stuff:

This is maybe one of the greatest wild life phenomenon on the planet ever captured on lens!
In the sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico, a massive congregation of Munkiana Devil Rays, relative of manta rays, was captured by a German photographer Florian Schulz, displaying unusual event which he dubbed as the Flight of the Rays.
But as this wonderful perspective shows, for all the individuals leaping out that are visible at sea level, there are many more below the surface. The jaw-dropping image below shows only a quarter of the whole scene.
No one knows why the rays gather like this, whether to mate, herd prey or migrate or just for the sheer joy of being together.

we-are-star-stuff:

This is maybe one of the greatest wild life phenomenon on the planet ever captured on lens!

In the sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico, a massive congregation of Munkiana Devil Rays, relative of manta rays, was captured by a German photographer Florian Schulz, displaying unusual event which he dubbed as the Flight of the Rays.

But as this wonderful perspective shows, for all the individuals leaping out that are visible at sea level, there are many more below the surface. The jaw-dropping image below shows only a quarter of the whole scene.

No one knows why the rays gather like this, whether to mate, herd prey or migrate or just for the sheer joy of being together.

(via waasabi)

dynamicoceans:

An octopus matching the color and texture of the coral quickly changes to a warning white when attacked by a territorial fish.
Many thousands of color-changing cells called chromatophores just below the surface of the skin are responsible for the transformations. The center of each chromatophore contains an elastic sac full of pigment, rather like a tiny balloon. If you squeezed a dye-filled balloon, the color would be pushed to the top, stretching out the surface and making the color appear brighter—and this is the same way chromatophores work. When the sac expands the color is more visible.  Iridophores have stacks of reflecting plates that create iridescent greens, blues, silvers and golds, while leucophores mirror back the colors of the environment, making the animal less conspicuous.
They can change not only their coloring, but also the texture of their skin to match rocks, corals and other items nearby. They do this by controlling the size of projections on their skin, creating textures ranging from small bumps to tall spikes. The result is a disguise that makes them nearly invisible. 
http://ocean.si.edu/ocean-news/how-octopuses-and-squids-change-color

dynamicoceans:

An octopus matching the color and texture of the coral quickly changes to a warning white when attacked by a territorial fish.

Many thousands of color-changing cells called chromatophores just below the surface of the skin are responsible for the transformations. The center of each chromatophore contains an elastic sac full of pigment, rather like a tiny balloon. If you squeezed a dye-filled balloon, the color would be pushed to the top, stretching out the surface and making the color appear brighter—and this is the same way chromatophores work. When the sac expands the color is more visible.  Iridophores have stacks of reflecting plates that create iridescent greens, blues, silvers and golds, while leucophores mirror back the colors of the environment, making the animal less conspicuous.

They can change not only their coloring, but also the texture of their skin to match rocks, corals and other items nearby. They do this by controlling the size of projections on their skin, creating textures ranging from small bumps to tall spikes. The result is a disguise that makes them nearly invisible. 

http://ocean.si.edu/ocean-news/how-octopuses-and-squids-change-color

(via p4cifc)